NetOpen21

NetOpen21: modeling open innovation communities with network science

What is Net-open?

“NetOpen21: modeling open innovation communities with network science” is a half-day satellite to the Network 2021 conference (6-10 July 2021) happening on June 30th, 8:30am-12:30pm EST. It aims to bring together an interdisciplinary group of theoreticians, data and network scientists, social scientists and open innovation practitioners (among others) to interrogate and investigate how large-scale, fine-grain datasets of open science, citizen science and open-source ecosystems allow to measure and model collaborative processes underlying collective performance in science and engineering.

The satellite will alternate between invited and contributed talks, along with a final lightning talk session. The call for contribution can be found below! The satellite will be held entirely online. Participants will need to register to the main conference, including 2 weeks of satellite events. Thanks to the support of the OCEAN program, we will be able to provide financial support for contributors, to make sure everyone can participate!

Description of the session

Contemporary science and innovation is a team endeavor. Not only are 90% of scientific papers co-authored, collaboration is associated with higher impact too. Teams can organize the energy and ideas of collaborators so that their whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Therefore, there is tremendous desire to scale these benefits through mass collaboration, harnessing the crowd through open science and innovation. For example, the open-source and open science movements have demonstrated that communities of 1,000+ can contribute to a common goal in a short time. Yet collaboration at these scales creates unique challenges, from communication to coordination, which, if left unaddressed, could jeopardize the completion and the success of the projects. In particular, the COVID-19 pandemic has shown the challenge of coordinating large-scale, self-organized, open collaborative initiatives to provide an advanced collective response to the emergency. Understanding how collaboration network structure underlies performance is thus key for the design of organizational strategies as well as the development of new technologies for making groups more effective and collective actions more scalable. 

Prompted by the prevalence of the phenomenon, a series of studies have explored how team composition, organization or dynamics determine team performance and survival, usually relying on conceptual models or proxies of interaction data. In parallel, the sociology of science has offered numerous in-depth insights from case studies, revealing the multiple factors that influence the way a group of individuals work together both in closed and open settings towards a common goal. Despite these advances, we are still lacking fine-grained quantitative insights and network growth models on i) the micro-level, intra-team interaction processes underlying project performance and ii) the macro-level, inter-teams collaborations underlying the scalability and resilience of team ecosystems in open settings. 

The purpose of this satellite is to bring together an interdisciplinary group of theoreticians (in particular from Statistical Physics and Ecological modeling), data and network scientists (with expertise in open-source and open science communities data such as GitHub, SciStarter, or Zooniverse), social scientists (with expertise in knowledge and collaboration networks) and open innovation practitioners (community coordinators, open program leaders) to interrogate and investigate how large-scale, fine-grain datasets of open science, citizen science and open-source ecosystems allow to measure and model collaborative processes underlying collective performance in science and engineering. Overall, we expect such insights will help outline a sustainable framework to design open organizations with high ecosystemic resilience able to cope with future challenges requiring resilience and rapid collective actions at scale, both in public and private domains.

Preliminary agenda

  • Introduction to open innovation data and models ~10 minutes  
  • Session I (1h30): The organization of science and engineering in open collaborative projects (focus on data sources and representations)
  • Break (10 min)
  • Session II (1h30): Methods and models to study open organisation networks (focus on theoretical models and their applications)
  • Break (10 min)
  • Lightning talk session and Q&A (40 minutes)
  • Conclusive remarks (5 min)

Each session will alternate between invited and contributed talks, for a total of ~10 speakers.

Organisers

Marc Santolini (CRI)
Liubov Tupikina (Bell Labs)
Robbie Ward (GeorgiaTech)
Juniper Lovato (UVM)

For more information about this satellite, please contact us.

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